B.A. Anthropology, Archaeology
wishing to learn more about osteoarchaeology, paleopathology, and bioarchaeology
needing to satisfy my curiosity of people, cultures, and places.

 

We Are Family: A Family Tree of the Entire Human Race

Oh my god, I’ve reached the end of my queue.

Hang tight, folks!

Cod bones reveal 13th century origin of global fish trade

archaeologicalnews:

London’s international fish trade can be traced back 800 years to the medieval period, according to new research published today in the journal Antiquity.

The research, led by archaeologists from UCL, Cambridge and UCLan, provides new insight into the medieval fish trade and the globalisation of…

Hidden Paintings Revealed at Ancient Temple of Angkor Wat

archaeologicalnews:

Each year, millions of visitors flock to Angkor Wat, an ancient temple in modern-day Cambodia. There, they marvel at the 900-year-old towers, a giant moat and the shallow relief sculptures of Hindu gods. But what they can’t see are 200 hidden paintings on the temple walls.

New, digitally…

Medieval skulls found in Coventry's Old Grammar School

archaeologicalnews:

Fragments of medieval skulls and bones have been found during the restoration of a 12th Century building in Coventry.

The bones found in the Old Grammar School are believed to date back to some time between the 12th and 16th Centuries.

The excavation of the Grade I listed building is part…

Urethral syringe used in 19th century venereal treatment declared best archaeological find

archaeologicalnews:

Alan Humphries, the Librarian of the Thackray Medical Museum in Leeds, identified this as a urethral syringe used to treat ailments in men by injecting substances directly into the penis.

Sarah Bond, of London’s Museums of Health and Medicine, suggested that this is a syringe for delivering…

CONFIRMED: the Shrine of Jonah/Mosque of Yunus (Nineveh, Mosul, Iraq) has been destroyed

What 'The Golden Girls' Taught Us About AIDS

artisansoulleader:

thepowerofmoonlight:

Learnt an interesting thing today on this arabic course,
The original Arabic number system looked like this, the one we now use.
It was designed so each character had the corresponding number of angles to the number, so the number 1 has 1 angle, 2 has 2 angles, 3 has 3, 0 has none etc…
It is so obvious now, I’ve always assumed its one of those things that just is, with no logical explanation, but here it is, perfectly simple and satisfying

My jaw is legit on the floor right about now :D

artisansoulleader:

thepowerofmoonlight:

Learnt an interesting thing today on this arabic course,

The original Arabic number system looked like this, the one we now use.

It was designed so each character had the corresponding number of angles to the number, so the number 1 has 1 angle, 2 has 2 angles, 3 has 3, 0 has none etc…

It is so obvious now, I’ve always assumed its one of those things that just is, with no logical explanation, but here it is, perfectly simple and satisfying

My jaw is legit on the floor right about now :D

Women Listening To Men In Art History

I was kind of thinking of skipping school today. I mean, how much is there to learn about the Aztecs anyway?

Marissa Cooper, The OC

MARISSA YOU FOOL YOU HAVE SO MUCH TO LEARN.

(via casethejointfirst)

When I was a student at Cambridge I remember an anthropology professor holding up a picture of a bone with 28 incisions carved in it. “This is often considered to be man’s first attempt at a calendar” she explained. She paused as we dutifully wrote this down. ‘My question to you is this – what man needs to mark 28 days? I would suggest to you that this is woman’s first attempt at a calendar.’

It was a moment that changed my life. In that second I stopped to question almost everything I had been taught about the past. How often had I overlooked women’s contributions?

Sandi Toksvig (via suzythered, learninglog)

strangeremains:

Forensic scientists compile guide on how to identify child abuse, starvation
Forensic scientists from North Carolina State University published a paper in which the researchers “outline common diagnostic characteristics and patterns of non-accidental injuries and neglect as a result of nutritional deprivation” that can be used by investigators to identify child abuse and starvation.  Read more.

strangeremains:

Forensic scientists compile guide on how to identify child abuse, starvation

Forensic scientists from North Carolina State University published a paper in which the researchers “outline common diagnostic characteristics and patterns of non-accidental injuries and neglect as a result of nutritional deprivation” that can be used by investigators to identify child abuse and starvation.  Read more.