B.A. Anthropology, Archaeology minor

wishing to learn more about osteoarchaeology, paleopathology, and bioarchaeology

needing to satisfy my curiosity of people, cultures, and places.

I'll try to keep this blog as academic and anthropology-related as possible. For my personal page full of dancing gifs, check out ichwanderegern.tumblr.com

 

allthingsaafs:

Figure 1: Ubelaker’s (1989) diagram showing the dental development in correlation to age.

Figure 2: Gustafson and Koch’s (1974) image showing the variation in timing of dental development. Colour key: Black highlights the age that crown mineralization begins, Dark grey shows the age of crown completion, Light grey shows the age of eruption, and White displays age of root completion.

Quick Tips: How To Estimate The Chronological Age Of A Human Skeleton – Using Dentition To Age Subadults.

This Quick Tips post is the third in the series on age estimation of human skeletal remains, if you haven’t read the first post clickhere to start at the beginning.

The practice of using dentition to chronologically age human skeletal remains is split into two halves, depending on the whether the skeleton is that of a subadult or adult. This blog post is going to discuss using dentition to age subadults.

Due to the abundance of teeth found in many archaeological, forensic, paleontological, and anthropological contexts and because of the regular tooth formation and eruption times, dental development is the most widely used technique for aging subadult remains. As stated in my previous blog post, several elements of the human skeleton begin the stages of epiphyseal fusion alongside the conclusion of tooth eruption; these two techniques (dentition and epiphyseal closure) are often used complementary to each other to help age sub-adults. When it comes to subadult tooth emergence there are four stages:

Stage 1 is where most of the deciduous teeth, commonly referred to as ‘milk teeth’, emerge during the second year of life.

Stage 2, during this stage the two permanent incisors and the first permanent molar emerge, this stage typically occurs between the age of six and eight years.

Stage 3, occurs between the age of ten and twelve and it involves the emergence of the permanent canines, premolars, and second molars.

Stage 4, or the final stage involves the third molar emerging around the age of eighteen years.

When looking at dentition you must look at all aspects of emergence and not just at the fully erupted tooth, which includes the completeness of all roots and crowns (formation) and the position of each tooth relative to the alveolar margin (eruption).

Click here to read the rest of this blog post on All Things AAFS! 

This is the third of a Quick Tips series on ageing skeletal remains, the next in this series will focus on the use of dentition to age adults and the use of cranial suture closure. To read more Quick Tips in the meantime, clickhere

To learn about basic fracture types and their characteristics/origins in their own Quick Tips series, clickhere!

Did I ever tell you about the “Oh Shit” cake?
I was presented with this already baked, already assembled cake by my boyfriend’s mother and was asked to frost and decorate it for his birthday that night. First photo is the initial presentation photo. The cake then proceeded to fall apart when I added the frosting. I’m thankful my boyfriend was there to see it because I don’t think anyone would otherwise believe me.

Walking, talking, and climbing stairs IS apparently too much for me.

Archaeological News: Infected and Hunched: King Richard III Was Crawling With Roundworms

archaeologicalnews:

William Shakespeare depicted King Richard III as a crooked ruler, due to the monarch’s supposed ruthless demeanor and his curved spine. A new study suggests that in addition to scoliosis, Richard III suffered from a roundworm infection.

Interest and research into the monarch has spiked since…

partybarackisinthehousetonight:

if you’re ever feeling lazy just remember that the ancient greeks believed their gods lived on top of a very climbable hill but no one even bothered to check

centuriespast:

Moche
Chimbote, Santa Valley, north coast, Peru
Vessel in the Form of a Warrior, 100 B.C./A.D. 500
Art Institute Chicago

centuriespast:

Moche

Chimbote, Santa Valley, north coast, Peru

Vessel in the Form of a Warrior, 100 B.C./A.D. 500

Art Institute Chicago

Tomorrow night, I’m going to the city and having a wild night out. Why this always has to coincide with my period arriving and my face exploding, I still haven’t figure out.

ancientpeoples:

Silver Vessel with leaf ornament
Hellenistic Greek
c. 250-100 BC
This lavishly decorated vessel depicts the abundant vegetation of the Dionysian realm. The elaborate sculptural decoration was formed by repoussé (a technique in which metal is impressed from the rear to form a raised design) and incision; the neck was turned on a lathe; and details were gilded. Ceramic versions of such vessels were mass-produced.
Source: The Walters Art Museum

ancientpeoples:

Silver Vessel with leaf ornament

Hellenistic Greek

c. 250-100 BC

This lavishly decorated vessel depicts the abundant vegetation of the Dionysian realm. The elaborate sculptural decoration was formed by repoussé (a technique in which metal is impressed from the rear to form a raised design) and incision; the neck was turned on a lathe; and details were gilded. Ceramic versions of such vessels were mass-produced.

Source: The Walters Art Museum

ohmystarsy:

HISTORY MEME | 2/10 moments: Baltic Way

The Baltic Way was a peaceful political demonstration that occurred on August 23, 1989. Approximately two million people joined their hands to form a human chain spanning over 600 kilometres (370 mi) across the three Baltic states – Estonian SSR, Latvian SSR, and Lithuanian SSR, republics of the Soviet Union.

The protest was designed to draw global attention by demonstrating a popular desire for independence for each of the entities. It also illustrated solidarity among the three nations. It has been described as an effective publicity campaign, and an emotionally captivating and visually stunning scene. The event presented an opportunity for the Baltic activists to publicise the illegal Soviet occupation and position the question of Baltic independence not as a political matter, but as a moral issue. The Soviet authorities in Moscow responded to the event with intense rhetoric, but failed to take any constructive actions that could bridge the widening gap between the Baltic states and the Soviet Union. Within seven months of the protest, Lithuania became the first of the Republics of the Soviet Union to declare independence.

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